Children who have been abused or traumatized in some way may benefit from working with a therapist. Children often reenact trauma through repetitious play in order to establish mastery over

Children who have been abused or traumatized in some way may benefit from working with a therapist. Children often reenact trauma through repetitious play in order to establish mastery over their emotions and integrate experiences into their history on their own terms. Through the use of toys and props, children may naturally share their emotions and past experiences without feeling the pressure they might encounter with traditional talk therapy. For this Discussion, review the course-specific case study for Claudia and the Chiesa (2012) and Taylor (2009) articles. · · References (use 3 or more) Ruffolo, M. C., & Allen-Meares, P. (2013). Intervention with children. In M. J. Holosko, C. N. Dulmus, & K. M. Sowers (Eds.), (pp. 41–69). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Taylor, E. R. (2009). Sandtray and solution-focused therapy. (1), 56–68. van der Kolk, B. A. (2005b). Developmental trauma disorder. (5), 401–408. Gil, E. (1991). . New York, NY: Guilford Press: Specific skills and knowledge are essential for a social worker working with children. Understanding transference and countertransference is crucial to a healthy therapeutic relationship. Both transference and countertransference can be evident in any client–therapist relationship, but are especially important in working with children because of a common instinct among adults to protect and nurture the young. The projection or relocation of one’s feelings about one person onto another, otherwise known as transference, is a common response by children (Gil, 1991). Countertransference, a practitioner’s own emotional response to a child, is also common. For this Discussion, review the Malawista (2004) article. · · References (use 3 or more) Chiesa, C. (2012). Scripts in the sand: Sandplay in transactional analysis psychotherapy with children. (4), 285–293. Ruffolo, M. C., & Allen-Meares, P. (2013). Intervention with children. In M. J. Holosko, C. N. Dulmus, & K. M. Sowers (Eds.), (pp. 41–69). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Taylor, E. R. (2009). Sandtray and solution-focused therapy. (1), 56–68. Malawista, K. L. (2004). Rescue fantasies in child therapy: Countertransference/ transference enactments. (4), 373–386.

Do you need us to help you on this or any other assignment?


Make an Order Now