Compare and contrast Dr. Sloper from Washington Square and Bazarov from Fathers and Sons ———– consider the instructions very carefully. Style is as important as

Compare and contrast Dr. Sloper from Washington Square and Bazarov from Fathers and Sons ———– consider the instructions very carefully. Style is as important as substance in this case. [1] You are to write in a formal expository style addressed to the educated, non-specialized reader of, say, the NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE. This approach rules out extended narration or description; jargon; informal levity (not to be confused with wittiness); the use of the first person pronoun (singular or plural). “I believe” or “It seems to us” should be “apparently.” [2] Do not tell us what you are going to do; just do it. Avoid a construction like “This paper will discuss,” which is, after all, but a ponderous substitution for “I am going to discuss” (see previous rule). Other kinds of padding (such as comments on the author’s life or on the greatness of his literary works) will not impress anyone either. [3] Certain common words and phrases are proscribed: very, to a great extent, in terms of, definite(ly), truly, great, feel (as a verb meaning “believe”).Others should be used only after intensive self scrutiny: crisis, revolution, explosion. [4] No contractions (“can’t” for “cannot”), slang, or colloquialisms (with or without the grace of quotation marks). [5] In papers on an anthology, incorporate references into the text: As Hamlet puts it, “To be or not to be” (III, I, 56). Beowulf crossed the “whale path” (p. 15, l. 41). [6] Generalizations should be fortified with the evidence on which they are based, whether in the form of reference, brief paraphrase, or quotation. Good writing is a pendulum swing between generalization and specificity. Generalities are to be avoided, as are cant and platitudinous writing. (Look these words up if you do not understand them.) NB: Note in this selection from Voltaire how example immediately follows generalization (twice): “There is no sect in geometry; one does not refer to a Euclidean or Archimedean. When the truth is evident, it is impossible for parties and factions to arise. There has never been a dispute whether daylight could be seen at noon.” [7] If you yourself do not understand what you are trying to say, do not say it. [8] Quotations should be brief and neither rare nor overly frequent. They should be prepared for, and their SIGNIFICANCE (the explanation of which requires not mere paraphrase but analysis, explication, the giving of ramifications) should then be provided. [9] The MS (with margins of at least one inch, title at the top of the first page, but personal identification only on the outside, i.e., the back of the last page) should be a third or fourth draft, double spaced, proof- read, and a joy to behold.

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