Respond to two of your classmates’ posts It is my opinion that the reconciliation of the two different perspectives on learning exhibited in the videos would require research. I understand

Respond to two of your classmates’ posts It is my opinion that the reconciliation of the two different perspectives on learning exhibited in the videos would require research. I understand the success that is evident from Japan’s method, however, I am not certain that we would see the same results here in the United States unless the Japan method was the initial way that our students are taught. In the United States, if we started off teaching our students to solve problems first and then provide them with the strategies, this method would definitely open a gateway to higher order thinking. A merge between the Khan Academy’s flipped classroom and the Japan method would allow students to initially make an attempt to solve a problem and then learn different strategies to solve the problem. After learning the strategies, they would then be applied to solve more like kind problems. The relevance of the Khan Academy’s method is that students have the ability to learn at their own pace. Students are not pressured to keep up with the pace of the class. This allows the student to fully comprehend and master strategies before they have to progress to a more advanced level. Students have the ability to go back and review strategies for better understanding in case they have forgotten material and the relevance in Japan’s method is that students are required to apply higher order thinking initially. I believe that both approaches reflect constructivism due to the fact that each method requires students to apply previous knowledge. In Khan Academy’s approach, students are using knowledge, skills, and experience from prior lessons in order to advance to the next level of lessons. In the Japan approach, students are required to use prior knowledge, skills, and experience to come up with a solution to a problem. Because of this, in my opinion, both methods reflect constructivism. I would choose Japan’s method to support and ensure students master twenty-first-century skills. The Japan method requires students to think first. Not only do students just have to think, they have to utilize higher thinking strategies. After students think of ways to problem solve on their own, they collaborate and strategize collectively. These skills are essential for the twenty-first-century student. The Japan method involves students utilizing their “how to skills” regularly. They aren’t dependent on one strategy to solve a problem, yet their brains are being conditioned to find out how to do things without a strategy, then the students are provided with several ways to problem solve, hence equipping them with several tools in their toolboxes. Michael Pershan.  (2012, July 6). TED Talks.  (2011, March). [Video file].  Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html Classmate 2: After you watch both videos, think about the focus of this week’s reading: delivering effective lessons that connect your students to learning. Constructivism is a process of active learning that allows students to link new information to prior knowledge. This concept allows children to not fall behind but to learn and master to move on to the next lesson and apply the past knowledge to the new knowledge. For teachers to allow for peer to peer assistance, which allows students to facilitate the learning in a different style and allowing teacher to assist students who may require more than peer to peer. “Partnership for 21stCentury Learning’s model for acquiring 21st century skills. In order to master 21st century learning, students must develop crucial skills, including: life and career skills; learning and innovation skills; and information, media, and technology skills. These skills are built on the foundation of core subjects and curriculum” (Newman 2013). Michael Pershan.  (2012, July 6). Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHoXRvGTtAQ Rystad, M.  (2013, April 7). Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcLMlY6R7RM Takepart (2014, August 18). Khan Academy Empowers Teachers/TEACH/ TakePart. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyumCz5lJ8c

Do you need us to help you on this or any other assignment?


Make an Order Now